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Squash Soup

11/17/2009

I promise to make this the last squash post for a while–it’s just that it’s what I’ve been craving. It’s not that I’m in a squash rut–it’s just so good! Plus, winter squash apparently has a lot of health benefits and is high in Vitamins A and C and dietary fibers.

 

A few days ago one of my roomates walked in and asked me why we had a gourd sitting on our table. It wasn’t a gourd, though, it was a carnival squash. I originally created this recipe for butternut squash after lots of experimenting and recipe-reading. It’s actually still an experiment–it comes out a little bit differently each time, but always tasty. The latest experiment, though, was making it with carnival instead of butternut squash. Once cooked, the carnival squash gets a little ugly–instead of that rich, fall orange that butternut gets, the carnival squash goes from bright to dull yellow to a yellowish brown. Maybe that’s why butternut squash soup became the mainstream fall soup of choice. It should have been carnival–it’s flavor is much more dynamic, sweet but able to withstand savory.

When I make this soup (which I have been doing about once a week for the past month), I pretty much throw the ingredients into the pot in varying amounts each time. I am going to give measurements here, but ultimately, it’s up to your taste buds. I like my squash soup to have a zing to it, so I add a few extra twits of the pepper grinder. I also like my squash soup thick, so I use less stock where a soupier version might call for more, etc.

Squash Soup

1/2 onion, diced

1 tsp fresh ginger, finely chopped

olive oil

1 carnival squash, peeled and chopped

2 cups vegetable broth

1 tsp cinnamon

3/4 tsp nutmeg

salt and pepper to taste

Sauté onions and ginger until the onions are translucent.

Carnival squash has really hard skin, making it difficult to peel. Stab the squash with a fork and microwave it for a minute. Then cut the squash in half, using a spoon to scoop out the seeds and fibers in the cavity. Because of the ridges, it is easier to peel if you cut the squash into sections and peel each individual section. Once peeled, chop the squash into pieces–the smaller the pieces, the shorter the cooking time.

Pour stock and squash chunks into the pot. Bring to a boil and allow to cook until squash pieces are tender. Add spices. Use an immersion blender to puree the soup to the desired consistency. Leaving a few chunks behind just makes for a fun surprise later.

This soup, like many others, absorbs the flavor gradually, so it can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator. If you are going to serve it later, don’t edit the spices after tasting–add them before serving. I also love serving/eating squash soup with popcorn–freshly made, lightly salted. It adds a great extra texture.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. Jennie permalink
    11/17/2009 10:13 PM

    My mom makes this soup!! She adds an apple or two, which gives it a nice, sweet taste.

    xo

  2. kruleintentions permalink
    11/18/2009 5:47 PM

    i’m impressed that you peal your own squash. i’ve gotten really lazy and buy it pre-pealed. also! reminder! TOFU

  3. Ilana permalink
    03/08/2010 3:10 PM

    Excellent recipe! I made this soup tonight and it was super filling and tasty!

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